7 excellent email marketing examples from 2017

January 3, 2018 McKenzie Gregory

See a roundup of our favorite email campaigns from this year 

One of our favorite things to do here at Emma is geek out over stellar email examples that land in our own inboxes. After all, talking aspirationally about how people can do great email marketing is one thing; watching brands we love actually do it is another. 

Here, I've collected some of our favorite examples we shared on the Emma blog in 2017. Check them out, then explore each of the original posts they belong to for more inspiration! 

 

1. Polyvore

This is a classic example of a B2C re-engagement email from a young, lighthearted brand. For Polyvore’s audience, this emoji-driven, Messenger-style win-back was the perfect way to draw in folks who had grown disinterested by speaking their language.

 

Featured in: 7 irresistible win-back emails

 

2. Nordstrom Rack

Nordstrom Rack’s emails have a tendency to get a little busy, but they absolutely nailed it with this one. The arrow GIF points directly to the CTA button and tells your gaze exactly where to go – a super smart way to capitalize on eye tracking and encourage action. 

 

Featured in: Emails we love: The Valentine's Day edition

 

3. Doordash

This cart abandonment example from Doordash follows design best practices, uses playful copy, and instantly captures your attention with that hilarious illustration. And B2B companies can follow their lead: For instance, a tech company (like us!) could do this with an expired trial account or lapse in communication with a salesperson. 
 
Anytime you can track someone's behavior and see that they're falling off in your cycle, use email to automate the process of getting back in front of them.
 

Featured in: 4 simple ways to boost email engagement

 

4. The Hustle 

Growing your brand’s audience can feel like a daunting task, but one of the easiest ways to draw in new people is to leverage the folks you’ve already won over
 
These email campaigns can take lots of shapes, from straightforward referral programs to giveaway contests (share this email for X entries). But no matter how you frame it, make sure to adequately reward your subscribers for the effort they put in – AKA, don’t ask them to share an email with 30 friends and offer nothing in return. 
 
 

5. Headspace

Sure, GIFs can work as a flashy design element, and there’s nothing wrong with a GIF used simply because it adds a little flair to your campaign. But we especially love when they’re used for a functional purpose: In this case, to prove the value of a service.

Headspace is a meditation program that helps you relax and focus, so this GIF does a wonderful job showcasing why you probably should be using it. Watch it cycle through a few times to see what they mean. 

 

Featured in: Our absolute favorite GIFs in email

 

6. Jetsetter 

Sometimes, simple is best. This email from Jetsetter eliminates distraction by making the path here a simple choice: Choose a destination that interests you from this no-fuss group of tiles. By reducing friction, you'll increase the chances of your subscribers taking action and clicking through to your website. 

Featured in: 7 of our all-time favorite travel email examples 

 

7. Dallas Stars 

This impressive welcome email creates a seamless fan experience from the Stars' website to the inbox. With an eye-catching design and the use of sophisticated techniques like CSS animation (click here to see it in action), this email creates an incredible first impression and shows that the Stars truly care about crafting the best possible subscriber experience. 

 

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Featured in: Emails we love: The sports edition

 


Want even more email design and strategy inspiration? Check out our Top 12 Emails of 2017 guide! 

About the Author

McKenzie Gregory

McKenzie Gregory is a senior content manager on Emma’s marketing team. A Nashville native, she can be found covering all things email on the Emma blog, debating hyphenation rules, and watching obscene amounts of Netflix without a trace of shame.

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