10 Event invitation email examples that win the inbox

To digital marketers, event invitation email examples can sometimes look too similar. This is especially true if they're presented without explanations. If you’re looking for inspiring event registration emails with contextualized positive features, we’re here to help.

As with any content, there are best practices for crafting invitation email samples. We’ll learn about them later on. 

Before anything, let’s talk about why event invitation emails are so important to digital marketing. Let’s go over some real emails and pinpoint the noteworthy characteristics of each.

 

Why are event registration emails important?

Here’s a good statistic to set the stage: An average person receives a little more than 121 emails daily. A large part of digital marketing includes email campaigns. Email is more universal than social media and more affordable than traditional post, after all. You can send event invitations without postal fees and can expect near-instant responses.

Email invites and registration prompts are essential to increasing foot traffic⁠—or site traffic, if you’re holding an online gathering like a webinar or live stream⁠—at your event. Email marketers send anywhere from three to more than six emails when promoting concerts, conferences, and more. The majority email their subscribers about a single event four to five times.

What makes these 10 invitation email samples effective?

Engaging emails are not just good. They’re great. However, it’s not productive to describe them that way and leave it be. You need to know the reason behind the perceived greatness—which is why we’re going to look at more than a few invitation email samples together.

Below are 10 different emails with one or more features that make for effective examples. 

 

1. Havenly X Orly Khon holiday workshop

From reading only the larger text, you already know who is behind the event and what to expect from it. The questions below the background-complementing image are earnest, with a hint of humor. The entire email is understandable enough in one scan, and the RSVP button indicates a sense of urgency as well.

Havenly email is understandable enough in one scan, and the RSVP button indicates a sense of urgency, as well.

Source: Really Good Emails

2. Pure Collection clearance sale

Less is more. The black-and-white image is a prime backdrop for the touches of pink throughout. Because of the extreme contrast, you pick up the phrases “75% off everything” and “clearance event”⁠—as well as icons for the date and time⁠—in the first seconds of looking at the email. 

A curious aspect of this email, though, is that it actually promotes two separate events. Your eyes miss the exact details the first few times because of the color, or lack thereof. 

 

 

A curious thing about this email, though, is that it actually promotes two separate events. Your eyes miss the exact details the first few times because of the color, or lack thereof.

Source: Milled

3. Synapse 2019 user conference

We love the time visualization at the beginning of this email. Very effective at conveying information and creating a sense of urgency—the latter is thanks to the 50% off promo code and the CTA button to purchase tickets.

The full version of this email includes more than one sneak peek at what Synapse 2019 has to offer, too.

 

The full version of this email includes more than one sneak peek at what Synapse 2019 has to offer, too.

Source: Really Good Emails

4. Git Merge 2018 community conference

Repeating the date and location underneath the header is a nice touch, as the banner may not always load for all subscribers. A link to a video recapping the past year’s conference acts as social proof to assure potential ticket buyers their purchase will be worth it. 

A link to a video recapping the past year’s conference acts as social proof to assure potential ticket buyers that their purchase will be worth it.

Source: Really Good Emails

5. Cotton Incorporated booth at the Outdoor Retailer summer market

Here’s another email with multiple CTA buttons—which shows that function wins over form. Again, the text on the image repeats in the body of the email in case the image doesn’t load. We’re also enjoying the conversational, but still informative, tone of this invitation email.

the text on the image repeats in the body of the email in case the image doesn’t load. We’re enjoying the conversational but still informative tone of this invitation email, too.

Source: Really Good Emails

6. Guess Los Angeles in-store Eco event

The clever use of color in this email supports the point of the event: To drive sales of Guess Eco items, which are Guess products made from environmentally conscious components. Although red is the classic color of the Guess logo—as seen on the model’s tank top—green dominates the email.

From the tote bags to the succulent plants, and even the in-store DJ and the eco-friendly clothing collection, you can tell the promotional event is targeting a very specific audience.

 

Although red is the classic color of the Guess logo—as seen on the model’s tank top—green dominates the email.

Source: Milled

7. SeatGeek promotes Post Malone in Boston

The vivid color contrast ensures you know what the email is about at a glance. We like the cheeky but topical way SeatGeek used Post Malone song titles—“Paranoid,” “Better Now,” and “Rockstar”—to add interest to their email copy. Note the links for iOS, Android, and Web at the footer, too. They’re likely to offer optimized versions of this email to different device users.

 

Source: Really Good Emails

8. The Magician at The NoMad featuring Dan White

The email’s look and layout tells you right away that it’s an invite for an interactive magic show on New Year’s Eve. The fancy but modern tone matches the event details. It ends with a CTA button and a reminder that tickets will sell fast. We also appreciate the understated links to the brand’s social media accounts and official website.

The email’s look and layout tell you right away that it’s an invite for an interactive magic show on New Year’s Eve.

Source: Really Good Emails

9. The Beach People free in-store event

Of all the event invitation email examples so far, this one is the most concise while still including every detail. Brand name, followed by a pre-header line to introduce the invitation, and then a main header inspiring action. The exclusive event features discounts, freebies, and even a sleep expert with her picture in the email.

The exclusive event features discounts, freebies, and even a sleep expert with her picture in the email.

Source: Milled

10. Bit Bash 2017 alternative games festival

We’ve praised the color palettes of previous event registration emails, but none of them come close to this one. There’s an obvious summer camp theme throughout the email—from the opening line to bunk bed references and tree images and emojis. We love the pun at the end, too. 

There’s an obvious summer camp theme throughout the email, from the opening line to bunk bed references and tree images and emojis. We love the pun at the end, too. “In-tents”!

Source: Really Good Emails

 

What elements should be in all event invitation email examples?

You may know the answers by now. We’ve dissected several event registration emails in quick succession.

These components should form the foundation of every one of your invitation emails:

 

  • All the pertinent details: Can we really call an email an invitation if it doesn’t include the exact venue, date, time and duration of the event? Extra points for including physical parking details or online event login information. Some event invitation emails may also include the venue directions and a Google Maps link or embed.

  • Effort in design and layout: A great invitation focuses on its job and doesn’t try to multitask. Don’t fit too many visual elements in the email and be careful about your word count. Consider adding high-quality images, particularly if you’re promoting an event with performers or key speakers.

  • Personalization and conversation: Establish a connection with your audience quickly. Personalizing subject lines, greetings, and headers on top of segmenting your email campaign will accomplish this. Humor and creativity also keep your email fresh and interesting. Almost 60 percent of event marketers online use personalization in the email invites they send. 

  • A reputable sender name and detailed email signature: A professional name including your brand name will help keep your sender reputation up. For example: “Brand A Customer Support Officer Rick” or “Mary from Brand B.” Your email signature should also appear with the best ways to reach you, from an alternate email to a physical address (whatever you feel comfortable sharing as a professional, of course). This is doubly important if you’re sending out invites, because people may have additional questions about events. 

  • A call to action: Most event invitation email examples have a call to action element because that’s often the point of these messages⁠—to elicit engagement in a way that comes naturally to subscribers. You want to lead them to a decision that benefits both them and your brand. Consider leveling up and using a call-to-action button in place of a simple text link, as this may increase click-throughs by more than 25 percent

  • Basic social media integration: This is relatively easy to do⁠—just add social media icons to the header or footer of your emails. Very useful should you decide to run a multi-platform contest for your subscribers. 

As always, start with email marketing best practices before anything else. Focus on putting your best foot forward by writing amazing subject lines, too. 

Wrap up

We shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but it happens all the time in this short-attention-span world. Whether or not someone chooses to RSVP through your event registration email may depend on how attractive and effective your email invite is to them. Even if all needed elements are in your email, no one will want to read it without some special incentive, however small. 

Put yourself in their shoes: What would you want to know about an event before confirming your attendance? How would someone sell the event successfully to you?

 

Remember to:

  • Keep things interesting 

  • Add some off-beat or humorous elements if it’s appropriate 

  • Make sure your event invitation email examples capture and retain your audience’s attention. 

Want to level up your event invitation email game? Consider using animated GIFs in your next email marketing campaign.

About the Author

Emma Email

Emma is an email marketing platform that gives you all the tools you need to send campaigns that really connect with your subscribers. Unlike other email providers, Emma puts their customers first. It's email marketing that works for you.

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