Best practices for high-converting email signup forms

June 21, 2016 McKenzie Gregory

 

We can deal out all the advice in the world for achieving email marketing greatness, but none of it will do you much good if you don’t first have a quality email list. After all, having an engaged audience is pretty critical to the whole marketing process – and the larger and more qualified your list, the more effective your marketing will be.

To convince your target audience to subscribe to your emails, you first have to reel them in with a fantastic signup form. There’s lots of research out there about which kind converts the best, but lightboxes (aka, popups) are a great solution for those looking to quickly grow their list: Marketers average a 46% uptick in new signups when they implement one.

Here are a few examples of lovely (and super strategic) custom lightboxes our own Technical Services team created for Emma clients. If you’re interested in getting something like this made for your own website, give us a shout! Or, simply use these lightboxes as inspiration for creating a high-converting form of your own.

 


 

Dropzone Marketing

We absolutely loved the idea behind this lightbox from Dropzone Marketing. The copy makes it crystal clear they’re out to provide valuable content – and that you should feel free to opt out the instant you don’t feel like you’re getting anything out of their mailings. It’s a bold move that shows they truly care about serving up relevant, helpful content to their audience.

 

 


 

Mia and Moss

Women’s retailer Mia and Moss wanted a stylish lightbox that would fit with the aesthetic of their site. So our Tech Services team designed this bad boy. It’s beautiful and smart: It appears after 4 seconds on an individual’s first visit to the page, but on additional page views, it’s on a 60-second delay. That way, site visitors don’t feel bombarded by the form, but they’re still given multiple opportunities to sign up for the brand’s emails.

 

 


 

The Mazama Store

The Mazama Store spiced up their form by taking advantage of seasonal icons and some playful copy. Plus, they kept things low-pressure by adding a large “X” to the top and a noticeable close link at the bottom.

Pro tip: Note how in the copy, this brand chose to emphasize the fact that they don’t give out their subscribers' personal information. One of the biggest reasons people withhold personal information (like their email address) is fear for their privacy, so this move helps to remove that barrier.

 

 

 


 

Revelator Coffee Company

The simple, clean aesthetic of this lightbox couldn’t be more fitting for Revelator Coffee Company’s website. And leading with a discount offer for new subscribers gives people a valuable incentive to sign up for their list.

 

 


 

Xenith

Copy that indicates exclusivity adds another layer of persuasion to your signup form. After all, who doesn’t want to be a part of something special? So lead with something like “Become an insider,” “Get VIP access,” or “Join the movement” rather than simply “Join our email list.”

 

 

 


 

The Growler Guys

If you want to serve your audience ultra-targeted emails, you need to learn a little bit more about them. Many marketers shy away from including this many fields on their signup form, but most people are willing to part with more information if they know it will mean receiving content and offers that are actually relevant to their needs and interests.

 

 

 


 

This just shows off a tiny bit of what our team can do. Learn more about our available services here.

 

About the Author

McKenzie Gregory

McKenzie Gregory is a content writer on Emma’s marketing team. A Nashville native, she can be found covering all things email on the Emma blog, debating hyphenation rules, and watching obscene amounts of Netflix without a trace of shame.

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